Wandering Arteaga

 

Arteaga

Our Pueblo Mágico next door.

We’ve all been there.  And this is what it looks like:

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At least, on a Sunday, this is what Arteaga looks like.

For those who haven’t been to Arteaga (on a Sunday), there’s a pretty large market that sets up all over Arteaga’s Alameda every Sunday.  Go early, because parking is a pain mid-afternoon!

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La Colmena Candy Store off the Alameda–open during the week, too!

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The other day–a THURSDAY MORNING–(who goes to Arteaga on a Thursday morning?)  this is what it looked like:

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Shhhh . . . it’s very quiet here on a weekday!
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Maybe too quiet for some . . .

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La Llorona, carved into a tree.     La Llorona is legendary all over Mexico for having killed her children after her husband was unfaithful to her.

 

 

But I love Arteaga when it’s quiet!

Plus, I was pleasantly surprised to learn that there are some restaurants open during the week.

I also ventured off the Alameda and found the Plaza de Armas.  It’s another tree-lined square, with the mayor’s office on one end and the elementary school on the other.

Another block away (behind the elementary school) was Arteaga’s main church, San Isidro Labrador.  His feast day is the 15th of May.  So when the kiddies don’t have school for Teacher’s Day, swing by Arteaga–I bet these few blocks will be rockin’!

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Don Arteaga himself.  This plaque was terribly unhelpful, but it seems that he was a war hero when the French invaded (and took over) Mexico in the 1860s.
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Arteaga in season

 

Here’s a gorgeous video from Televisa, highlighting the town (and county) much better than I can!

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Downtown Tour–on Video!

For those who aren’t yet in Saltillo, and are looking to get a feel for the place, I’ve added this video from Hannah and Doren.  They’re missionaries affiliated with SALT church (on Eulalio Gutierrez, just north of HEB San Patricio, and services are informal and largely in English, for those interested).

Doren grew up here in Saltillo, and Hannah moved here last year, and this is one of their many videos showcasing what they enjoy about living in Saltillo.

This one gives us a brief walking tour of Saltillo’s colonial downtown area.

Thanks for sharing, Hannah and Doren!

 

If you enjoyed that, pass on some love and subscribe to their youtube channel!

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If anyone else has photos, videos, or written reflections they’d like to share here, send them to saltilloexpats@gmail.com or send Jill a message through the SaltilloExpats facebook group.

 

 

The Best Place to Buy Piñatas in Saltillo

img_4636A birthday party in Mexico just isn´t a birthday party, unless a piñata is beaten to a pulp.

In fact, the word piñata is often an abbreviated term for birthday party.  “Ceci is going to a piñata tomorrow” is a legitimate way to say that Ceci is going to a birthday party.  Because, after all, what is the point of a birthday party without the piñata?

Among other places, piñatas are sold at the market downtown and any materias primas store.  (For those who haven´t been to a materia prima store, that´s a whole cultural experience in itself!  The Cuellar stores on the Periferico, or El Doblón on Eulalio Gutierrez are great examples.  The first time I wandered through one, I thought I had died and gone to candy heaven.)  However, in my experience, the best place to get a piñata in Saltillo is on the corner of Luis Corona and Matamoros, downtown.
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Four or five family-owned stores dot the corner of Corona and Matamoros.  Piñatas are made right there, and they cost anywhere from $75 to $160, depending on the size.  Yes, even those freakishly huge, larger-than-the-birthday-boy piñatas can cost $150.  img_4635

Now, my birthday girl had to scan the stores, as she hates to hit anything that has a face.  Almost all piñatas have a face.  Fortunately, her birthday is close to Christmas, and one store still had two traditional star piñatas left over from Christmas.

Traditionally, the piñata is a seven-pointed star.  The seven points represent the seven deadly sins.  When the piñata is broken, the children are showered with the rewards of resisting evil.  What the symbolism becomes when a princess or superhero is beaten to death, I´m not sure.  But kids (over the age of 4) sure love it!

The pre-Christmas posadas usually involve piñatas, so if one is looking for a piñata during the Guadalupe Reyes season (December 12-January 6th), they recommended buying one ahead of time.  These stores on Corona and Matamoros are also willing to make custom-made piñatas with a week´s notice.  (It would be a good idea to give them a bit more notice during December.)  625

The birthday parties at our house are usually a bit different from typical Mexican birthday parties, given cultural norms that I either don´t want to participate in or don´t realize exist.  But we do always have a piñata.

Everyone goes home happy.

 

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This is the first of a series “The Best of Saltillo”.  Know of a great place for . . . well, basically anything?  Share with us!   Send in your recommendation with at least 2 photos, an address or good directions and as many specific details as would be helpful for others to saltilloexpats@gmail.com.

 

 

Back to School: in Mexico!

All around the world, it´s that time of year.  All of us who have school-aged children are battling the crowds, shopping for notebooks, pencils, and uniforms.  School is school the world over, right?

Yes it is.  However, when I first came to Mexico, there were a few customs that threw me through a loop, and life would gone more smoothly with prior warning.

 

So, without further ado, here´s my Mexican Back to School To Do List:

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Once kids are in elementary school, they have at least 5 notebooks and 5 textbooks (likely more) that all need to be covered.  The notebooks need to be color-coded, according to subject, and then sealed with contact paper.  The textbooks also need to be preserved for all time with the help of contact paper.

Has anyone else noticed how contact paper gets static electricity and takes on a mind of its own?  Yes it does.  It makes this never-ending job all the
more tedious.

On the bright side, I have heard that some papelerías offer book-covering services for $50 or less.  That´s $50 well spent.  They just need to advertise better on my side of town!

 

Stock up on newspapers

Homework  for kids in preschool and early elementary school often consists of bringing in magazine or newspaper cutouts.

  • Bring in cutouts of musical instruments.
  • Bring in 10 cutouts of people waving hello or goodbye.
  • Bring in 10 words that start with the letter C.
  • Bring in 5 cutout triangles.
  • Bring in 10 proper names.

Apparently, there is no end of things kids can be asked to cut out.  Now, if I were to let my 5-year-old use the scissors and look for all 10 of those letter Cs himself, we could easily spend hours and hours on kindergarten homework.  To facilitate things, I have him look for one (and sometimes help point it out) and he cuts out the first one (to work those fine-motor skills, of course).  Then I cut out a number of words, about a third of which start with C.  Out of the words I cut out, I ask him to identify which ones start with C, so then he can pick them out and glue them in his notebook.

And then he cuts words out here and there as he sees fit, as that boy loves scissors.

In the end, the homework gets done in a timely manner, and the kid works both his brain and his fingers a bit.  Win-win.

 

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In the list of school supplies that the teachers give out every year, there is always that odd addition:  4 rolls of toilet paper.

The following week, we are then hit up to donate some bleach and mop soap.  Maybe this is just a public school thing (but I doubt it).  See, for public schools in Mexico, the government builds the building and pays the teachers.  The parents are responsible for the rest–primarily, maintaining the school building.  That donation that they ask for every year for the Parents´ Association?  That money is very necessary, paying for the school´s telephone bill, ink for the printer, repairs that need to be made throughout the year, etc.

So every couple of months, kids go to school, armed with a package of toilet paper.  Hands-down, it´s one of the more essential school supplies.

 

Fingernail Checks

This doesn´t happen at my kids´ public schools, but I´ve heard that some private schools will write notes home, chastizing the parent if a child has very long fingernails.  If they´re long enough to gather dirt, they´re at risk for the Fingernail Note!

Once upon a time, I worked at a children´s home, taking care of elementary aged kids. Those kids were sent back home if their fingernails were too long!  Watch out!

 

Other Quirks

Last Friday of the Month

A few years ago, it was mandated by the Secretary of Public Education that the last Friday of every month be set aside for teacher inservice days.  So, all public school students (and I believe most private school students) have the last Friday of every month free.

End of School?

The last day of school in Mexico has always been a bit of an enigma.  Even when I was a
teacher, I had no set date when the last day of school would be, because it´s possible for private schools to be finished a week or two before the official last day of school set by the government.  However, each school needs an official visit from the SEP by the end of the year, for them to determine if the students reached their academic goals (and could therefore be done for the year).

Things get even trickier this year, because it appears that the SEP is giving schools the option of having a longer school day, and having a 185-day school year.  Or schools can stick to their regular hours and use the 200-day calendar.  So the last day of school is either June 27th OR July 18th–depending on your school.

Since my son´s school day has been extended, but my daughter´s hasn´t, it seems one kid will start summer vacation in June and the other in mid-July.  Awesome.

 

But we´ve got 190 more days of school to get through first, so let´s enjoy them!

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Sidenote:  I haven´t had any experience with Mexican junior high and high schools yet–is there anything else at those levels I should prepare myself for?  (Besides the whole, “I have a teenager” thing, of course.)

Is there anything else with the Back-to-School season that throws you for a loop?  Let me know in the comments section!

 

Moving To Saltillo

Hi! Let me introduce myself, my name is Lisa, and I will be guest blogging here once in a while about my experience moving to Mexico.

I have lived in Saltillo now for about a year and a half. I knew for most of a year before the actual move happened that I would be coming; so I had plenty of time to research, and thankfully I did. At the time, this wonderful site did not exist, however, I found Jill after weeks of searching. Thankfully she is a wonderfully  kind and patient person who answered all of my crazy questions!

My first question to Jill was basically “Where should I live?” At this time, I had never even been to Mexico. NEVER, not for spring break, not for vacation, never.  I had no actual intention of  coming to Mexico in my life, but when my husband called one day from work and mentioned he had been offered a position at the plant here in Mexico, that all changed.  This was also our first ex-pat assignment. We had moved from our home state of Michigan to North Carolina, not even two years before. Moving any time makes you think, where is the best place to live in that new area. Asking people’s opinions on where to live is always a great place to start.

 

My situation moving with a company could be different than yours, people move here for many different reasons, work, retirement, marriage, to name a few. When moving with a company usually they have some restrictions on where you can live, or what kind of allowance you have for housing. Also the location of your work could affect where you would want to live. Many expats live in the north of Saltillo, mostly because of proximity to work. There are a few that live in Centro (downtown), and a few that live in the south,but the greatest number of us live inthe north.068

That being said, my experience is based on living in the north end of town and renting a house. There are options here to live in a gated community or a house not in a gated community. Many houses on the street will have gated garages and entrances, so that someone can not just come and knock on your front door, they would need to ring a door bell, then you would have to let them in the gate and then into your house. In a gated community there are usually guards at the gate that will monitor who comes and goes, but once someone is in the community they can knock on your front door.

Another option are apartments.  There are few furnished apartments for rent. My husband lived in one of the furnished apartments while we were in the transition to full time in Mexico. The one he stayed in came with amaid service, as well as refilling of paper products, and clean sheets every few days.

Some companies have real estate agents they have a partnership with, other companies do not. One thing you need to remember is, the real estate agents will not show you every available house.  Usually, they will show you only the houses they have listed, or their connections have listed.

I really enjoyed looking at houses here in Saltillo, since they are so different than houses I had the chance to see before. I hope you enjoy them too! And best of luck finding the right fit for you.

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If you´re not currently in Saltillo, but want an idea of what houses for rent are like, click here.  Even if your Spanish is nonexistent, scroll through the pictures and enjoy the range of options available!

Chin Up, Buttercup

Unlike other areas of Mexico, Saltillo does experience changing seasons.  Coming from the northern US, it took me awhile to catch on, as the change of the seasons here is much more subtle than it is there.

014  The one sign that says “fall” to me here in Saltillo is the arrival of the butterflies.  Monarch butterflies, en route between their summer home in Canada to their wintering grounds just north of Mexico City, pass right through Saltillo.

And they are passing through this week.

On Tuesday, I was getting down about seeing the clouds and fog roll in again.  Then I looked up, and saw five monarchs fly right over my patio.  Why worry about the rain tomorrow when I can enjoy the monarch butterflies today?   020

So if you´re feeling a little down, look up.  Catching just a glimpse of those orange and black wings in sunlight makes me catch my breath.  They´re so fragile, yet they fly thousands of miles.  Within a butterfly´s lifespan, they surely can´t make more than one round trip, can they?  Yet they all meet up together in the mountains in Michoacan.  How do they do it?  They´re downright awe-inspiring.

Be inspired.  Look up this week.